This page describes how to get WISP firmware and software via a source code repository. Questions? - ransford ransford maintains this page.

The WISP firmware is under active development. Bleeding-edge development happens on the community repository. If all you want is the most stable release of the WISP firmware, the WISPFirmware page offers direct-download links.

Community repository at GitHub


Intel Research has transferred responsibility for the WISP firmware to the user community. As of September 2010, all new development on the WISP firmware happens on the community repository hosted at GitHub. The "right way" to hack on the WISP firmware, whether to fix bugs or to add features, is to fork the community repository corresponding to the WISP hardware you have (e.g. the dlwisp41 repository for the DL WISP 4.1), develop locally, and submit a pull request when you're done. (If you don't understand these terms, you can find a quick introduction to Git at GitHub's help page.)

Quick start (for DL WISP 4.1)

  1. Install git. Pre-built binaries are available for all major platforms.
  2. git clone git://github.com/wisp/dlwisp41.git

Slightly more elaborate start (for DL WISP 4.1)

If you want to make significant changes to the code and don't expect to contribute your changes back to the community (e.g., because they're not relevant to WISP variants other than your own), you may want to fork the WISP firmware repository and do your development there. Your own fork is also a good place to test code changes that you do intend to contribute back.
  1. Install git (as above)
  2. Create a GitHub account
  3. Visit the main dlwisp41 repository and click "Fork" to create your own fork
  4. git clone git@github.com:yourusername/dlwisp41.git
  5. To contribute code, create your own topic branches and send pull requests upstream.

Twitter updates

Following @wispcommits on Twitter is one way to track updates to the community repository.




Old Subversion repository (No new development)



The community repository started as a fork of Intel Research's original Subversion repository. For historical reasons, that repository remains accessible and contains original releases. However, no new development occurs on the Subversion repository; you should use the community repository if you want the most recent




Introduction to SVN



In various places in this Wiki, we have downloadable tarballs of development snapshots. If, however, you want to get up-to-the-minute code versions or contribute your own code to the project, you'll need access to our SVN code repository.

To access the SVN code repository, you'll need a SVN client. SVN clients are available for all sorts of operating system. Some SVN clients are listed in the "resources" section below.




Read-only access to the SVN repository



To check out the most current version of the SVN repository for read-only access with the TortoiseSVN client, point Windows Explorer at the folder you want to put the code in, and right click and select SVN checkout. In the URL textbox, type:



//////https://svn.seattle.intel-research.net/repos/wisp_challenge//////
To do the same thing with a command line client, open a terminal window, change to the directory you'd like to put the code in, and type:





//////svn export https://svn.seattle.intel-research.net/repos/wisp_challenge//////






Read-write access to the SVN repository



If you need read-write access and already have a ssh account with Intel Research Seattle, you can use the same commands above.

You'd like to contribute code to the contribs section, but don't have an ssh account with Intel Research Seattle? Great!!// Just send a note to - pollyp pollyp and she'll get you set up.

Resources


Tigris has an excellent collection of Subversion links.

"Version Control with Subversion" is published by O'Reilly books. The first edition is available online here and you can get the second edition via Safari online. (If you have a Seattle Public Library card, you can access Safari online for free here.)

Tigris has a collection of command-line binaries for many different operating systems.

TortoiseSVN is a GUI SVN client for Windows that's tightly integrated into Windows Explorer.




The last modification was made by - ransford ransford on Jan 24, 2012 6:55 am